NPI Lookup for Behavioral Health & Social Service Providers

NPI Number One (NpiNo.org) helps you easily look up more than 1,363,444 behavioral health & social service providers in the United States of America. NPI Number One provides detailed information, including personal overview, history of education and training, specialities, practice locations, and more. All information produced by the NPI Number One is actually provided in accordance with the NPPES Data Dissemination Notice. The NPPES creates a record for each health care provider to whom it assigns an NPI.

  • Behavioral Health & Social Service Providers

    Broad classification aggregating providers who are trained and educated to perform services related to behavioral health, mental health, and counseling and may be licensed or practice within the scope or licensure or training.

    Below is the list of sub-categories of medical works where behavioral health & social service providers participate in.

    • Assistant Behavior Analyst

      An assistant behavior analyst is qualified by Behavior Analyst Certification Board certification and/or a state-issued license or credential in behavior analysis to practice under the supervision of an appropriately credentialed professional behavior analyst. An assistant behavior analyst delivers services consistent with the dimensions of applied behavior analysis and supervision requirements defined in state laws or regulations and/or national certification standards. Common services may include, but are not limited to, conducting behavioral assessments, analyzing data, writing behavior-analytic treatment plans, training and supervising others in implementation of components of treatment plans, and direct implementation of treatment plans.

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    • Behavior Technician

      The behavior technician is a paraprofessional who practices under the close, ongoing supervision of a behavior analyst or assistant behavior analyst certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and/or credentialed by a state (such as through licensure). The behavior technician is primarily responsible for the implementation of components of behavior-analytic treatment plans developed by the supervisor. That may include collecting data on treatment targets and conducting certain types of behavioral assessments (e.g., stimulus preference assessments). The behavior technician does not design treatment or assessment plans or procedures but provides services as assigned by the supervisor responsible for his or her work.

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    • Behavioral Analyst

      A behavior analyst is qualified by at least a master’s degree and Behavior Analyst Certification Board certification and/or a state-issued credential (such as a license) to practice behavior analysis independently. Behavior analysts provide the required supervision to assistant behavior analysts and behavior technicians. A behavior analyst delivers services consistent with the dimensions of applied behavior analysis. Common services may include, but are not limited to, conducting behavioral assessments, analyzing data, writing and revising behavior-analytic treatment plans, training others to implement components of treatment plans, and overseeing implementation of treatment plans.

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    • Clinical Neuropsychologist

      An individual with a doctorate degree, licensure in clinical psychology and specialized training or board certification in neuropsychology who practices or adheres to the principles of neuropsychology; a specialty within the field of psychology focusing primarily on neurobehavioral functioning.

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    • Counselor

      A provider who is trained and educated in the performance of behavior health services through interpersonal communications and analysis. Training and education at the specialty level usually requires a master’s degree and clinical experience and supervision for licensure or certification.

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    • Marriage & Family Therapist

      A marriage and family therapist is a person with a master's degree in marriage and family therapy, or a master's or doctoral degree in a related mental health field with substantially equivalent coursework in marriage and family therapy, who receives supervised clinical experience, or a person who meets the state requirements to practice as a marriage and family therapist. A marriage and family therapist treats mental and emotional disorders within the context of marriage and family systems. A marriage and family therapist provides mental health and counseling services to individuals, couples, families, and groups.

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    • Poetry Therapist

      A medical or mental health professional who has attained credentials after satisfactorily completing a poetry therapy training program approved by the National Federation for Biblio/Poetry Therapy (NFBPT). Training includes didactic work, peer group experience, and supervised practicum. An NFBPT credentialed certified poetry therapist (CPT) or registered poetry therapist (PTR) integrates discussion of published literature and reflective or creative writing into the psychotherapeutic process to achieve goals of emotional well-being, symptom reduction, and improved interpersonal communication. Certified poetry therapists and registered poetry therapists are licensed mental health professionals with advanced training in the theory and practice of poetry therapy. CPTs and PTRs are qualified to work independently with emotionally troubled populations in clinical, rehabilitative, community and educational institutions. They also work with emotionally healthy individuals adjusting to developmental issues, life crises, or disabilities. The PTR completes an advanced level of training and fieldwork, commensurate with the highest levels of clinical practice. The terms poetry therapy, applied poetry facilitation, journal therapy, bibliotherapy, biblio/poetry therapy, and poetry/journal therapy reflect the interactive use of literature and/or writing to promote personal growth and emotional healing. In addition to poetry, poetry therapy applies all forms or written and spoken language including story, myth, folk and fairy tale and other genres of poetic expression as well as journal, memoir, and narrative. The poetry therapy process integrates discussion of published literature and reflective or creative writing for expression and communication of thoughts and feelings to facilitate participants' emotional well-being. The field of poetry therapy encompasses all of these modalities, though only a duly trained and licensed clinical practitioner can be credentialed as CPT or PTR.

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    • Psychoanalyst

      Psychoanalysis is a comprehensive, theoretical framework which, when applied to a treatment process, consists of an intensive verbal, therapeutic relationship between an analyst and an analysand which aims for symptom relief, emotional growth, and personal integration. The psychoanalytic treatment process includes, but is not limited to, the recognition of unconscious processes and conflicts; the significance of developmental influences; and the impact of resistances, defenses, transference and countertransference phenomena. Treatment is enhanced by an understanding developed in the analyst’s training and personal analysis of unconscious manifestations, such as dreams, slips of the tongue, fantasies and day dreams. Psychoanalytic technique varies in relation to theoretical orientation.

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    • Psychologist

      A psychologist is an individual who is licensed to practice psychology which is defined as the observation, description, evaluation, interpretation, and modification of human behavior by the application of psychological principles, methods, and procedures, for the purpose of preventing or eliminating symptomatic, maladaptive, or undesired behavior and of enhancing interpersonal relationships, work and life adjustment, personal effectiveness, behavioral health, and mental health. The practice of psychology includes, but is not limited to, psychological testing and the evaluation or assessment of personal characteristics, such as intelligence, personality, abilities, interests, aptitudes, and neuropsychological functioning; counseling, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, and behavior analysis and therapy; diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorder or disability, alcoholism and substance abuse, disorders of habit or conduct, as well as of the psychological aspects of physical illness, accident, injury, or disability; and psycheducational evaluation, therapy, remediation, and consultation. Psychological services may be rendered to individuals, families, groups and the public.

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    • Social Worker

      A social worker is a person who is qualified by a Social Work degree, and licensed, certified or registered by the state as a social worker to practice within the scope of that license. A social worker provides assistance and counseling to clients and their families who are dealing with social, emotional and environmental problems. Social work services may be rendered to individuals, families, groups, and the public.

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