NPI Lookup for Respiratory, Developmental, Rehabilitative and Restorative Service Providers

NPI Number One (NpiNo.org) helps you easily look up more than 614,230 respiratory, developmental, rehabilitative and restorative service providers in the United States of America. NPI Number One provides detailed information, including personal overview, history of education and training, specialities, practice locations, and more. All information produced by the NPI Number One is actually provided in accordance with the NPPES Data Dissemination Notice. The NPPES creates a record for each health care provider to whom it assigns an NPI.

  • Respiratory, Developmental, Rehabilitative and Restorative Service Providers

    A provider who is trained and educated to perform services related to respiratory care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, developmental therapy, rehabilitation and restorative services and may be licensed, certified or practice within the scope of training.

    Below is the list of sub-categories of medical works where respiratory, developmental, rehabilitative and restorative service providers participate in.

    • Anaplastologist

      An anaplastologist is a professional who creates prostheses for the face and body. Patients treated include those missing anatomy due to cancer, traumatic injury, or birth differences. Generally, there are no state licensing requirements for anaplastologists. Certification specific to anaplastology is provided through the Board for Certified Clinical Anaplastology (BCCA) with a credential title of Certified Clinical Anaplastologist (CCA).

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    • Art Therapist

      (1) An individual who uses art to achieve the therapeutic goals of symptom relief, emotional integration, and recovery from or adjustment to illness or disability. (2) An art therapist uses a form of treatment that enables patients with mental or physical disabilities to use art as a way of expressing and dealing with feelings and inner conflicts. (3) An individual who uses arts modalities and creative processes during intentional intervention in therapeutic, rehabilitative, community, or educational settings to foster health, communication, and expression; promote the integration of physical, emotional, cognitive, and social functioning; enhance self-awareness; and facilitate change.

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    • Clinical Exercise Physiologist

      A Clinical Exercise Physiologist is a health care professional who is trained to work with patients with chronic disease where exercise training has been shown to be of therapeutic benefit, including but not limited to cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, and metabolic disorders.

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    • Dance Therapist

      The dance therapist, sometimes called a movement therapist, focuses on rhythmic body movements as a medium of physical and psychological change. Dance therapy is practiced more often with mental health patients than with physically disabled patients. A master’s degree is required by the American Dance Therapy Association to award the credentials Dance Therapist Registered (DTR).

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    • Developmental Therapist

      A Developmental Therapist is a person qualified by completion of an approved program in Developmental Therapy and where applicable credentialed by the state and practicing within the scope of the credential, or credentialed by completion of education experiences as approved by the state and practicing within the scope of that credential or, where state credentialing does not exist, certified by the Board of the Developmental Therapy Association. A developmental therapist evaluates children's global development in order to identify areas of developmental delay whether arising from physiological, neurological, or environmental factors, or a combination of factors; and designs, implements, and modifies therapeutic interventions for the child and the family to promote the child's acquisition of skills in a variety of developmental areas, including cognitive processes and social interaction in order to maximize functional independence and developmental homeostasis, and improve the quality of life at home and in the community; and provides consultation for the parents and other professionals working with the family on global development.

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    • Kinesiotherapist

      A provider trained and educated in the applied science of medically prescribed therapeutic exercise, education and adapted physical activities designed to improve the quality of line and health of adults and children by developing physical fitness, increasing mobility and independence, and improving psychosocial behavior. The kinesiotherapist seeks a coach-player relationship in which he/she helps the patient/client reach the goal of becoming an independent, self-sustaining person. Kinesiotherapists, as compared with physical therapists, put more emphasis on geriatric care, reconditioning and fitness, and psychiatric care. A large percentage of kinesiotherapists practice in Veterans Administration hospitals.

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    • Massage Therapist

      An individual trained in the manipulation of tissues (as by rubbing, stroking, kneading, or tapping) with the hand or an instrument for remedial or hygienic purposes.

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    • Mastectomy Fitter

      An individual trained in the fitting and adjusting of breast prostheses and management of post-mastectomy prostheses services.

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    • Music Therapist

      Music therapists use music interventions to assess clients' strengths and needs, develop goals, implement services, and evaluate and document progress for individuals of all ages. Music therapists facilitate changes in physical, cognitive, emotional, and/or psychosocial health.

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    • Occupational Therapist

      An occupational therapist is a person who has graduated from an entry-level occupational therapy program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) or predecessor organizations, or approved by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT), or an equivalent international occupational therapy education program; has successfully completed a period of supervised fieldwork experience required by the occupational therapy program; has passed a nationally recognized entry-level examination for occupational therapists, and fulfills state requirements for licensure, certification, or registration. An occupational therapist provides interventions based on evaluation and which emphasize the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (i.e., occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of facilitating participation in roles and situations and in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and are provided to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapists address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of occupational performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life.

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    • Occupational Therapy Assistant

      An occupational therapy assistant is a person who has graduated from an occupational therapy assistant program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) or predecessor organizations, has successfully completed a period of supervised fieldwork experience required by the accredited occupational therapy assistant program, has passed a nationally recognized entry-level examination for occupational therapy assistants, and fulfills state requirements for licensure, certification, or registration. An occupational therapy assistant provides interventions under the supervision of an occupational therapist which emphasize the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (i.e., occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of facilitating participation in roles and situations and in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and are provided to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy assistants address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of occupational performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life.

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    • Orthotic Fitter

      An individual trained in the management of fitting prefabricated orthoses.

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    • Orthotist

      A health care professional who is specifically educated and trained to manage comprehensive orthotic patient care, including musculoskeletal and neuromuscular anomalies resulting from injuries or disease processes involving the lower extremity, upper extremity or spinal segment/s and positional deformation of the cranium. Orthotists assess specific patient needs, formulate an appropriate treatment plan, implement the treatment plan and provide follow-up care.

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    • Pedorthist

      An individual who is trained in the management and treatment of conditions of the foot, ankle, and lower extremities requiring fitting, fabricating, and adjusting of pedorthic devices.

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    • Physical Therapist

      (1) Physical therapists are health care professionals who evaluate and treat people with health problems resulting from injury or disease. PT’s assess joint motion, muscle strength and endurance, function of heart and lungs, and performance of activities required in daily living, among other responsibilities. Treatment includes therapeutic exercises, cardiovascular endurance training, and training in activities of daily living. (2) A physical therapist is a person qualified by an accredited program in physical therapy, licensed by the state, and practicing within the scope of that license. Physical therapists treat disease, injury, or loss of a bodily part by physical means, such as the application of light, heat, cold, water, electricity, massage and exercise. They develop treatment plans based upon each patient’s strengths, weaknesses, range of motion and ability to function. (3) A health professional who specializes in physical therapy- the health care field concerned primarily with the treatment of disorders with physical agents and methods, such as massage, manipulation, therapeutic exercises, cold, heat (including short-wave, microwave, and ultrasonic diathermy), hydrotherapy, electric stimulation and light to assist in rehabilitating patients and in restoring normal function after an illness or injury.

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    • Physical Therapy Assistant

      (1)Physical therapist assistants are skilled health care providers who are graduates of a physical therapist assistant associate degree program accredited by an agency recognized by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education or Council on Postsecondary Accreditation, who assists the physical therapist in providing physical therapy. The supervising physical therapist is directly responsible for the actions of the physical therapist assistant. The PTA performs physical therapy procedures and related tasks that have been selected and delegated by the supervising physical therapist. Duties of the PTA include assisting the physical therapist in implementing treatment programs, training patients in exercised and activities of daily living, conducting treatments, and reporting to the physical therapist on the patient’s responses. In addition to direct patient care, the PTA may also perform such functions as patient transport, and clinic or equipment preparation and maintenance. Currently more than half of all states require PTAs to be licensed, registered or certified. (2) An individual who works under the supervision of a physical therapist to assist him or her in providing physical therapy services. A physical therapy assistant may, for instance, help patients follow an appropriate exercise program that will increase their strength, endurance, coordination, and range of motion and train patients to perform activities of daily life.

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    • Prosthetist

      A health care professional who is specifically educated and trained to manage comprehensive prosthetic patient care for individuals who have sustained complete or partial limb loss or absence. Prosthetists assess specific patient needs, formulate an appropriate treatment plan, implement the treatment plan and provide follow-up care.

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    • Pulmonary Function Technologist

      An individual who is trained and qualified to perform pulmonary diagnostic tests. In the course of conducting these tests, the Pulmonary Function Technologist is able to setup, calibrate, maintain, and ensure the quality assurance of the pulmonary function testing equipment. In the laboratory, clinical or patient care setting the technologist instructs patients, elicits cooperation, performs procedures, monitors patient response, and evaluates patient performance. Tests results are calculated, compared with predicted normal ranges, and evaluated for reliability. The technologist collects clinical history data and evaluates the clinical implications of the test results.

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    • Recreation Therapist

      A recreation therapist uses recreational activities for intervention in some physical, social or emotional behavior to bring about a desired change in that behavior and promote the growth and development of the patient.

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    • Recreational Therapist Assistant

      Recreational Therapist Assistants work in support of or assistant to Recreational Therapists treating patients with disabilities, injuries, and illnesses. Recreational Therapist Assistants work in a variety of settings providing treatments using recreational activities, including games, sports, and crafts.

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    • Rehabilitation Counselor

      An individual trained and educated in a systematic process of assisting persons with physical, mental, developmental, cognitive, and emotional disabilities to achieve their personal, career, and independent living goals assessment and appraisal, diagnosis and treatment planning, career (vocational) counseling, individual and group counseling interventions for adjustments to the medical and psychosocial impact of disability, case management, program evaluation and research, job analysis and placement counseling, and consultation on rehabilitation resources and technology. Certification generally requires a Master’s degree with specialized courses in rehabilitation processes and technology.

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    • Rehabilitation Practitioner

      A health care practitioner who trains or retrains individuals disabled by disease or injury to help them attain their maximum functional capacity.

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    • Respiratory Therapist, Certified

      A Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) is a an entry level therapist who has passed a standardized written examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). CRTs provide diagnostic testing, therapeutics, monitoring, rehabilitation, and education to patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary system. They provide these respiratory care services in all health care facilities and in the home. A CRT is a graduate of an associate degree program approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP) and where applicable, is licensed by the state and is practicing within the scope of the license.

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    • Respiratory Therapist, Registered

      A Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) is an advanced therapist who has passed standardized written and clinical simulation examinations administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). In addition, to the certified therapist (CRT) entry level skills, RRTs have advanced education and training in patient assessment, in the development and modification of patient care plans, and in assuring the appropriate utilization of respiratory care resources. An RRT is a graduate of an associate or baccalaureate degree producing educational programs approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) and where applicable, is licensed by the state and is practicing within the scope of that license.

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    • Specialist/Technologist

      General classification identifying individuals who are trained on a specific piece of equipment or technical procedure.

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